A Study to Assess the Knowledge regarding use of Glasgow Coma Scale in Critical Care Units among Staff Nurses at selected Hospitals

 

Mayavati Tupere, Sukanya Gaikwad, Krishnali Garje

CI Gokhale Education Society’s INETR Nashik.

*Corresponding Author E-mail: krishnaligarje14@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT:

Glasgow Coma Scale is a dependable and unprejudiced neurological evaluation kit applied for evaluating and recording the level of consciousness of a person. Evaluation of consciousness level using Glasgow Coma Scale is a tool necessitating knowledge which is vital in identifying immediate worsening of level of consciousness. Critical thinking used with skill and knowledge in Glasgow Coma Scale is the groundwork of nursing practice to avoid delay in clinical worsening and treatment. The aim of this study was to find out the knowledge score of Glasgow Coma Scale among nurses working in hospital. Objectives: 1. Assess the demographic data. 2. Assess the knowledge score regarding use of Glasgow coma scale in critical care units among staff nurses of selected hospitals. 3. To find out the association between existing knowledge score and demographic variables. Methodology: A Descriptive study design was used for the present study. Evaluative approach was used and sampling technique was used for this present study was simple random technique. The total population was 40 staff nurses at selected hospital. Tool used to collect the data was demographic data and modified self-structure questionnaire. Result: Total sample was 40 in that 65% of the staff nurses had good knowledge regarding GCS and 35% staff nurses had poor knowledge about GCS. Conclusion: The findings from this study showed that nurses had good knowledge regarding GCS.

 

KEYWORDS: GCS, Hospital staff nurses.

 

 


INTRODUCTION:

GCS continues to be the benchmark for evaluation, continuous surveillance, prognosis and clinical decision about consciousness in such patients1,2. In 1974, Teasdale and Jennet, innovated Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) to objectively quantify coma severity in acute medical and trauma patients3 Knowledge of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is recognized as an asset to all clinical nurses. However, many studies in different countries have reported low levels of knowledge of the GCS among nurses.

 

Glasgow Coma Scale is a neurological evaluation and recording the level of consciousness of a person. Evaluation of consciousness level using Glasgow Coma Scale. Glasgow Coma Scale is the groundwork of nursing practice to avoid delay in clinical worsening and treatment. The aim of this study was to find out the prevalence of inadequate knowledge of Glasgow Coma Scale among nurses working in a tertiary care centre.4

 

The scale measures the mental status of patients according to three categories of responsiveness: eye opening, motor response, and verbal response. Each component is assessed independently and given a score, and the sum of the scores for the three components is the GCS score. The maximum score is 15 and the minimum is 3.5,7

 

PROBLEM STATEMENT:

A study to Assess the knowledge regarding use of Glasgow coma scale in critical care units among staff nurses at selected hospital.

 

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:  

1.   Assess the demographic data.

2.   Assess the knowledge score regarding use of Glasgow coma scale in critical care units among staff nurses of selected hospitals.

3.   To find out the association between existing knowledge score and demographic variables.

 

HYPOTHESIS:

At level of 0.05% of significant.

H0: There will be no significant association between knowledge score with selected demographic data.

H1: There will be significant association between knowledge score with selected demographic data.

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A descriptive study was conducted at selected hospital. A sample consisted of 40 staff Nurses . this samples are selected randomly assigned in the study . A modified structured knowledge questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge of GCS among the samples. 

 

Inclusion criteria:

1.   Those who are working in critical care unit’s minimum for 6 months.

2.   Those are registered as a nurse.

3.   Those are interested and welling for study.

 

Exclusion criteria:  

1. Those are not interested and welling for study.

 

Data Collection Instruments:

Descriptive and chi-square test. Appropriate study instrument/data collection tool:

Section-I: Sociodemographic variable.

Section-II: Self-structured knowledge questioner.

 

Data Collection Process:

In present study 40 staff nurses were selected by random sampling technique. A formal written permission was obtained from the authority concerned and data was collected among staff nurse. The investigator explained to them the purpose of the study. They requested the participants full cooperation and assured them confidentiality of their response. Modified structure knowledge questionnaire on GCS was administered to the participants. To complete the tool was 20 min. the selected subjects were cooperative and the investigator expressed their gratitude for their cooperation. The collected data was compiled for analysis.   

 

RESULT:

Section 1: Demographic data / Baseline Performa:

The result shows that 77.5% of the nurse come under the age group of 20-30 and 62.5% are females and 37.5% are male. 40% of the nurses have completed Basic BSc nursing and remaining 15% nurses have completed PBBsc 17.5% nurses have completed Diploma (GNM), M.Sc Nursing. Approximately 27.5% of the staff nurses at hospitals. Designation of staff nurses 62.5% staff nurses 17.5% Senior staff nurses 12.5% clinical nurses 2.5% charge nurses and 5% of nursing superidendent around 57.5% of them are having all type of ICU Presently working area and 42.5% of staff nurses presently working area at casualty. 3 year of experience in clinical area. Around  50% of nurses heard about GCS

 

Section II: Self- structed knowledge questionnaire:

Overall knowledge 65% of the staff nurses had good knowledge regarding GCS and 35% staff nurses had poor knowledge about GCS.

 

SECTION – I To assess the demographic data

Table 1. Frequency and percentages of demographic data   (n=40)

Sr.

No

Demographic variables

Frequency

%

1.

Age

 

 

20 -30 years.

31

77.5%

31 -40 years.

5

12.5%

41 -50years.

3

7.5%

51 -60years.

1

2.5%

Total

40

100%

2.

Gender

Male

 

15

 

37.5%

Female

25

62.5%

Total

40

100%

3.

Educational qualification

GNM .

 

07

 

17.5 %

B.Bsc Nursing

16

40%

P.B bsc Nursing.

06

15%

Msc Nursing

11

27.5%

Total

40

100%

4

Presently working area

Casualty

 

17

 

42.5%

All type of  ICU

23

57.5%

Total

40

100%

5

Total working experience.

6 months -3 years.

 

20

 

50%

4 -7years.

11

27.5%

8 – 10 years.

04

10%

More than 10 years.

05

12.5%

Total

40

100%

6

Source of information

Book

 

08

 

20%

 

Internet

13

32.5%

Doctor /senior sister

07

17.5

Syllabus of  course

12

30%

Total

40

100%

 

 

Section – II To determine the knowledge score on GCS among staff nurses at selected hospitals.

Table.2 Overall knowledge score about GCS.                       (n=40)

Sr. No

Knowledge score Grading

Frequency

Percentages %

1

Poor (0-6)

14

35%

2

Good (7-12)

26

65%

 

Total

40

100%

 

Fig.1 Graph shows that 65% of the staff nurses had good knowledge regarding GCS and 35% staff nurses had poor knowledge about GCS.

 

Table. 3. Mean, standard deviation and mean percentage, median, standard error, DF

Mean

Std. Deviation

Mean%

Median

SE

t value

6.8

2.077

0.618

7

0.32

3.13

 

Section – II To find out association between knowledge score on GCS with demographic variables.

Table: 4 Find out Association between knowledge score with selected demographic data

Sr.

No

Demographic variables

DF

P Value

X2

Result

1.

Age

 

 

3

 

 

7.82

 

 

3.6083

 

 

Not significant

20 -30 years.

31 -40 years.

41 -50years.

51 -60years.

2.

Gender

Male

1

3.84

0.013

Not significant

Female

3.

Educational qualification

GNM.

 

 

3

 

 

7.82

 

 

8.9226

 

 

significant

B.Bsc Nursing

P.B bsc Nursing.

Msc Nursing

4

Presently working area

casualty

 

 

1

 

 

3.84

 

 

0.114

Not significant

All type of  ICU

 

5

Total working experience.

6months - 3 years.

 

 

3                           

 

 

7.82          

 

 

5.93

 

 

Not significant

 

4 - 7years.

8 – 10 years.

More than 10 years.

6

Source of information

Book

 

 

3                             

 

 

7.82           

 

 

2.98

 

 

Not significant

 

 

Internet

Doctor/senior sister

syllabus of  course

 

Result shows that no any association find out in this research study.

 

DISCUSSION:

Section 1: Assessment of knowledge of nurses regarding GCS.

Knowledge was graded and that 90% of the nurses had good knowledge regarding GCS and 10% had average knowledge about GCS.

 

Section 2: Comparison of the study;

In the present study descriptive study on assessing the knowledge of nurses on EBP was conducted among 40 staff nurses. Overall knowledge 65% of the staff nurses had good knowledge regarding GCS and 35% staff nurses had poor knowledge about GCS.

 

CONCLUSION:

The findings from this study showed that nurses in Ghana have low levels of knowledge about the GCS. A  more structured approach to teaching the GCS that is very thorough and done with demonstrations should be implemented to improve nurses' knowledge on the GCS.

 

RECOMMENDATIONS:

Based on the findings of this study it is recommended that

1.   A Similar kind of study can be conducted for a large group.

2.   A study to assess the GCS on knowledge, attitudes and practices among staff nurses at selected hospitals.

3.   Assessment of Nurses’ Knowledge of GCS.

 

REFERENCES:

1.     Middleton PM. Practical use of the Glasgow coma scale: a comprehensive narrative review of GCS methodology. Australas Emerg Nurs J. 2012; 15(3):170–83. doi: 10.1016/j.aenj.2012.06.002.

2.     Teasdale G, Maas A, Lecky F, Manley G, Stocchetti N, Murray G, et al. The Glasgow coma scale at 40 years: standing the test of time. Lancet Neurol. 2014; 13(8):844–54. doi: 10.1016/S1474-4422(14)70120-6.

3.     Jain S, Iverson LM. Glasgow coma scale. 1st ed. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2022; 353.

4.     https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9446504/

5.     Jain S., Iverson L., Nagle J. Glasgow Coma Scale. Retrieved, http://knowledge.statpearls.com/chapter/pals/22258/from.

6.     Matis G., Birbilis T. The Glasgow coma scale – A brief review. Past, present, future. Acta Neurologica Belgica. 2008;108(3):75–89.

7.     De Sousa I., Woodward S. The glasgow coma scale in adults: doing it right. Journal of Emergency Nursing. 2016; 24(8):33–39. doi: 10.7748/en.2016.e1638.

 

 

 

Received on 06.10.2023        Modified on 22.10.2023

Accepted on 01.11.2023       ©A&V Publications All right reserved

A and V Pub J. of Nursing and Medical Res. 2023; 2(4):131-133.

DOI: 10.52711/jnmr.2023.32